Fellowship Opportunity: ERC Research Group Indigeneities in the 21st Century

2 Postdoctoral Fellowships and 1 Doctoral Position

Available from 1 April 2020 for the duration of 3 years (with the possibility of extension) at salary grade TVL 13 (Postdoc 100 %, Doctoral Position 75%).

The ERC-funded project “Indigeneities in the 21st Century” (2019-2024) attempts to understand how indigenous actors have evolved from “vanishing people” to global players. While the label ?indigeneity? circulates globally, it is also defined as a place-based marker of identity. This project breaks new ground by incorporating both dimensions ? global circulation and local experience ? in a common framework. It does so by studying entangled indigeneities as transregional and transcultural formations along the transpacific intersections between North and South America, Australia and the South Pacific. The project deploys historical, ethnographic and experimental museum methods, and is located at the disciplinary intersections between anthropology, art, history and philosophy. It aims at making a future-oriented contribution to (re)emerging indigeneities and the (re)negotiation of their (post)colonial legacies in and with Europe.

 The project seeks applications for 2 Postdoctoral Fellows and 1 Doctoral Student to join an international team of researchers led by Principal Investigator Prof. Dr. Philipp Schorch and conduct an individual project within the framework of ?Indigeneities in the 21st Century?. Candidates should be versed in indigenous cosmologies, epistemologies, ontologies and languages. A high level of academic English is required, and knowledge of other colonial languages (French, German, Spanish) is advantageous. Candidates should have an excellent early career research record and present evidence of outstanding potential. They will be expected to conduct fieldwork in the Pacific, consolidate his/her academic profile and expertise through publications and collaboration, and contribute to the research culture of the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at LMU Munich.

 The University is an equal opportunity employer. Handicapped applicants will be given preference in the case of approximately equal qualifications. LMU Munich is interested in increasing the number of female faculty members and encourages women to apply. Please submit the following application documents electronically by 15 November 2019 to Prof. Dr. Philipp Schorch (philipp.schorch@ethnologie.lmu.de <mailto:philipp.schorch@ethnologie.lmu.de> ):

As one pdf file (in English):

(1) Application letter (letter of intent)

(2) Curriculum vitae (including all publications)

 (3) Project proposal (max 5 pages)

 (4) Writing sample (e.g. a published paper or a chapter of the Doctoral/MA thesis)

 (5) Degree certificates

 (6) Names and contact details of two referees

Shortlisted candidates will be programmed for a skype interview that will take place in late November/early December 2019.

The project has received funding from the European Research Council (Grant Agreement No. 803302).

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellowship, National Gallery of Art

The National Gallery of Art hosts a postdoctoral curatorial fellowship funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This is a two-year fellowship with the possibility of renewal for a third year. The fellowship provides curatorial training and supports scholarly research related to the collection of the National Gallery of Art. The fellow is fully integrated into a specific curatorial department with duties, privileges, and status equivalent to those of an assistant curator. Time is divided between specific projects and general curatorial work within the department, including research on the collection and new acquisitions, work on the presentation of the collection, participation in aspects of special exhibition projects, and opportunities to give public lectures. The fellow will plan and complete a project in consultation with the supervising curator.

Through weekly gatherings and discussions, the fellow takes part in research-sharing and sessions that explore the inner workings of the Gallery.

Fellowship Period

The fellow must be in residence at the National Gallery of Art during the fellowship period, which lasts for two years, starting as early as the January after the fellow is selected.

Eligibility

Consideration is given to candidates working in fields represented by the Gallery’s permanent collection of European and American art, as well as candidates with special research focuses on African American art or art of the African diaspora, Latinx art and art history, and Native American art history. The doctoral degree in art history (or the equivalent in countries outside the United States) must be or have been officially conferred within five years (preferably three years) of the start date of the fellowship. Applicants from all backgrounds are encouraged to apply. This is an international program. If you have questions about your eligibility, please contact the program administrator at intern@nga.gov or (202) 842-6257.

DEADLINE TODAY: Free Student Museum Methods Event at AAA/CASCA, Vancouver 

Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
6393 NW Marine Dr, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada  

November 20, 2019, 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Sponsored by the Council for Museum Anthropology with generous funding from the AAA Section Mentoring Grant Program 

  Attention students! The Council for Museum Anthropology (CMA) invites current and recently graduated students (undergraduate, masters, and PhD) to apply to a Museum Methods event to be held on Wednesday, November 20 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, as part of the AAA/CASCA Annual Meeting. Students will be mentored on collaborative curating, exhibition techniques, and anthropological materials research by senior scholars and curators in small group sessions. Mentors include Jennifer Kramer (University of British Columbia), Susan Rowley (University of British Columbia), Jennifer Shannon (University of Colorado, Boulder), Joshua Bell (Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History), Diana Marsh (National Anthropological Archives), Morgan Guerin (Musqueam) and Debra Sparrow (Musqueam). The event will also involve an informal networking session during lunch (which will be provided). Transportation from the conference hotel to the Museum of Anthropology and back will be provided. Students need not have prior experience with museums, working with resource communities, or materials research.

To apply, current student and recent graduate (2018-2019) members of AAA/CASCA should submit an application with your contact information (email, phone), biographical details (Name, School, Department, Degree, Specialization), and a brief paragraph on why you are interested in this event and what you hope to learn from it (<250 words). Note that you do not need to be a member of CMA to apply. Applications should be sent to cmaapply@gmail.com by September 30, 2019. Decisions will be communicated by October 10, 2019, and applicants should confirm their attendance within a week of notification. 

Faculty, staff, and other mentors--please share widely!

 

New Editors for "Museum Anthropology" Journal

Last spring the CMA Journal Committee, led by David Odo, began the search for a new Editor(s) for our CMA section journal "Museum Anthropology." We are delighted to announce the new Co-Editors of the journal: Dr. Emily Stokes-Rees and Dr. Phaedra Livingstone.

Dr. Stokes-Rees is Associate Director of the School of Design and Associate Professor of Museum Studies at Syracuse University. Dr. Livingstone is a Professor and Program Coordinator for the Museum and Cultural Management program at Centennial College. Their term as co-editors will begin October 1.

Please join us in thanking past Editor Lea McChesney for her service to the field and in congratulating Co-Editors Stokes-Rees and Livingstone on their new positions!

Free Student Museum Methods Workshop at AAA/CASCA, Vancouver

Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia | 20 November 2019, 10:30 am – 2:30 pm

Sponsored by the Council for Museum Anthropology with generous funding from the AAA Section Mentoring Grant Program

The Council for Museum Anthropology (CMA) invites current and recently graduated students (undergraduate, masters, and PhD) to apply to a Museum Methods workshop to be held on Wednesday, November 20th from 10:30 am to 2:30 pm at the Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, as part of the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Students will be mentored on collaborative curating, exhibition techniques, and anthropological materials research by senior scholars and curators in small group sessions. Mentors include Jennifer Kramer (University of British Columbia), Susan Rowley (University of British Columbia), Jennifer Shannon (University of Colorado, Boulder), Joshua Bell (Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History), Diana Marsh (National Anthropological Archives), Morgan Guerin (Musqueam) and Debra Sparrow (Musqueam). The workshop will also involve an informal networking session during lunch (which will be provided). Transportation from the conference hotel to the Museum of Anthropology and back will be provided. Students need not have prior experience with museums, working with resource communities, or materials research.

To apply, current student and recent graduate (2018-2019) members of AAA/CASCA, please submit an application with your contact information (email, phone), biographical details (Name, School, Department, Degree, Specialization), and a brief paragraph on why you are interested in this workshop and what you hope to learn from it (<250 words). Note that you do not need o be a member of CMA to apply. Applications should be sent to cmaapply@gmail.com by 30 September 2019. Decisions will be communicated by 10 October 2019, and applicants should confirm their attendance within a week of notification.

Free Student Museum Methods Workshop at AAA/CASCA, Vancouver

Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia

20 November 2019, 10:30 am – 2:30 pm

 

Sponsored by the Council for Museum Anthropology with generous funding from the AAA Section Mentoring Grant Program 

The Council for Museum Anthropology (CMA) invites current and recently graduated students (undergraduate, masters, and PhD) to apply to a Museum Methods workshop to be held on Wednesday, November 20th from 10:30 am to 2:30 pm at the Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, as part of the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Students will be mentored on collaborative curating, exhibition techniques, and anthropological materials research by senior scholars and curators in small group sessions. Mentors include Jennifer Kramer (University of British Columbia), Susan Rowley (University of British Columbia), Jennifer Shannon (University of Colorado, Boulder), Joshua Bell (Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History), Diana Marsh (National Anthropological Archives), Morgan Guerin (Musqueam) and Debra Sparrow (Musqueam). The workshop will also involve an informal networking session during lunch (which will be provided). Transportation from the conference hotel to the Museum of Anthropology and back will be provided.

To apply, current student and recent graduate (2018-2019) members of AAA/CASCA, please submit an application with your contact information (email, phone), biographical details (Name, School, Department, Degree, Specialization), and a brief paragraph on why you are interested in this workshop and what you hope to learn from it (<250 words). Note that you do not need o be a member of CMA to apply. Applications should be sent to cmaapply@gmail.com by 30 September 2019. Decisions will be communicated by 10 October 2019, and applicants should confirm their attendance within a week of notification. 

 

 

"Museums Different" Day 3 - Anne Ray Interns' Report

Today was the final day of the 2019 Council for Museum Anthropology Conference. Appropriately for the last day, the morning Breakout Session, Roundtable Discussion: “Collaboration Conversation: Exploring Large-Scale Returns of Legacy Collections to Home Communities” centered on two Indigenous communities, Hopi and Pueblo of Pojoaque, whom are currently working on projects that would allow for the temporary return [not repatriation] of their cultural items. Especially for Pueblo of Pojoaque, the idea to bring back their Tewa pottery, is to bring back/strengthen important cultural values held in those vessels. 

Over lunch, we celebrated the end of the conference with traditional Pueblo cuisine made by the family of Tony Chavarria (Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Clara Pueblo). The food included delicious bean, beef and posole stew, red chili with potatoes and pueblo pie. After spending so much of the conference thinking and speaking on and about O’gha Po’oge (and its people), it was especially meaningful to close the last day with this food.

This afternoon, we attended the last plenary session called “Words to Ponder, Actions to Consider: Building Sustainable Change in Museum Anthropology.” Panelists included Governor Brian Vallo (Pueblo of Acoma), Teri Greeves (Artist and Curator, Kiowa), Tessie Naranjo (Independent Scholar, Santa Clara Pueblo), Cynthia Chavez Lamar (National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, San Felipe Pueblo), Manny Wheeler (Navajo Nation Museum, Diné), and Lynda Romero (Poeh Cultural Center, Pueblo of Pojoaque). Bruce Bernstein (Coe Center for the Arts) chaired the panel, and both he and the audience asked the panelists questions. First and foremost, we want to thank these panelists for all the time that they spent with us. We also want to acknowledge that this blog post does not do justice to the plenary conversation, and much more conversation needs to occur on the topics discussed.

One theme running throughout the conversation was about how white anthropologists and museum professionals need to listen, to pass the mic. Expanding on this point, Teri Greeves highlights the ways Indigenous peoples will continue to preserve their cultural sovereignty with or without museums: “we don’t need need you or your museums." Another major theme was about NAGPRA and as Governor Vallo termed it, “the cost of culture,” the amount of money that Indigenous peoples spend to simply secure the return of sacred materials and cultural patrimony. Cynthia Chavez-Lamar discussed how large museums need to leverage their resources and positions to support the goals of tribal museums and cultural centers. The conversation time ended with an audience comment from Nunanta (Iris Siwallace) who is from the Nuxalk Nation and works for the Ancestral Governance Office there. She asked about reconciliation, a conversation that is happening in Canada that is not as active in the US, and how acts of reconciliation can move beyond decolonization. We encourage the CMA, and non-Indigenous professionals and scholars working in cultural heritage institutions to continue thinking about the conversations shared by Indigenous scholars today.

Once again, Askwali and thank you to the nineteen Pueblo communities of O’gha Po’oge for hosting us and the rest of the CMA community.

-Erin Monique Grant (Colorado River Indian Tribes) and Amanda Sorensen

Anne Ray Interns, Indian Arts Research Center, School for Advanced Research

"Museums Different" Day 2 - Anne Ray Interns' Report

For a few and select students and/or early career professionals like myself, Day 2 of the CMA Conference began in a closed session titled “Collaborating for Change.” There, in a safe and supportive environment, participants shared issues and brainstormed ideas for change. My biggest takeaway from the session as an emerging indigenous scholar and museum professional is that no single person is alone with their problems.

About midday, some of the other staff from SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center and myself attended the Artist Roundtable: “Decolonial Gaps in Endemically Colonial Spaces: Photography and Photographers in Archives and Museums.” During the session, I was in awe of the Native photographers’ and their work to better their own communities through the tool of photography. I particularly enjoyed Will Wilson (Diné) and Raphael Begay (Diné) who both work to reinterpret how Native peoples and their lives are photographed. 

The rest of the day was spent at the famed Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). Before dinner, attendees and myself heard from academics and museum professionals who spoke about their projects (and work) at their home institutions, all of which seemed to aid in the betterment of indigenous communities’ relationships to historically colonial institutions like schools and museums. This included notes from Porter Swentzell (Santa Clara Pueblo, IAIA) about his place-based education and Diane Bird (Santo Domingo Pueblo, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology) who explained her efforts connect non-native researchers with tribal communities to ensure accuracy in the spread of information. Lastly, we all had the opportunity to enter the studios of two amazing IAIA student artists, Jodi Webster (Ho-Chunk jeweler/3D laser artist) and Edwin Neel (Kwakwaka’wakw woodworking artist).       

Askwali to the nineteen Pueblo communities of O’gha Po’oge for hosting me and the rest of the CMA community.

-Erin Monique Grant (Colorado River Indian Tribes), Anne Ray Intern, Indian Arts Research Center, School for Advanced Research